Tag Archives: introduced

Pink and Grey Galah (Cocky) – The Great Southern – Western Australia – (Eolophus roseicapilla)

Pink and Grey Galah (Cocky) – The Great Southern – Western Australia – (Eolophus roseicapilla)

Galahs were once confined to the open plains that occur beyond the inland slopes of the Great Divide in eastern Australia, north of the Flinders Ranges in South Australia, and north of the Mulga–Eucalypt line in Western Australia. However, following the clearing of subcoastal woodlands for farming, Galahs began to flood in, taking advantage of the new habitat and its abundant supply of food. They even spread to the coasts, where they are now a familiar sight in the cities.

Basic Information
Scientific Name: Eolophus roseicapillus
Featured bird groups: Parrots
Atlas Number:
273
What does it look like?
Description:
The Galah can be easily identified by its rose-pink head, neck and underparts, with paler pink crown, and grey back, wings and undertail. Birds from the west of Australia have comparatively paler plumage. Galahs have a bouncing acrobatic flight, but spend much of the day sheltering from heat in the foliage of trees and shrubs. Huge noisy flocks of birds congregate and roost together at night.

Similar species:
The Galah is generally unmistakable, but in flight may resemble aGang-gang Cockatoo in shape.

Where does it live?
Distribution:
The Galah is one of the most abundant and familiar of the Australian parrots, occurring over most of Australia, including some offshore islands.

Habitat:
The Galah is found in large flocks in a variety of timbered habitats, usually near water.

What does it do?
Feeding:
Galahs form huge, noisy flocks which feed on seeds, mostly from the ground. Seeds of grasses and cultivated crops are eaten, making these birds agricultural pests in some areas. Birds may travel large distances in search of favourable feeding grounds.

Breeding:
Galahs form permanent pair bonds, although a bird will take a new partner if the other one dies. The nest is a tree hollow or similar location, lined with leaves. Both sexes incubate the eggs and care for the young. There is high chick mortality in Galahs, with up to 50 % of chicks dying in the first six months. Galahs have been recorded breeding with other members of the cockatoo family, both in the wild and captivity. These include the Sulphur-crested Cockatoo, C. galerita.

Living with us
The Galah is becoming more abundant around areas of human habitation, with the growth in population largely a result of increasing availability of food and water. Escaped aviary birds have also contributed to these numbers.

References:
Parrots and Pigeons of Australia
Source:
http://www.birdsinbackyards.net/species/Eolophus-roseicapillus
http://www.birdlife.org.au/bird-profile/galah

My Playlist on Birds in My Area
Bird Sightings & Species of the Great Southern Area & Dumbleyung – Western Australia

First Time Nikon Coolpix P900 – Amazing Reptile Footage – Long Distance Shot – Earth is Flat!

Check out all of my amazing playlists of my adventures
https://www.youtube.com/user/LostTreasureComAU/playlists

First Time Nikon Coolpix P900 – Amazing Reptile Footage – Long Distance Shot – So I bought the Nikon Coolpix P900 to help with the effort to provide more convincing undeniable evidence that the Earth is Flat… so please subscribe and stay tuned! Flat Earth Proof Videos Coming Soon

See Evidence here: nikon coolpix p900 flat earth proofs!
https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=nikon+coolpix+p900+flat+earth

The P900 delivers the highest zoom in its class with 83x optical zoom (24mm – 2000mm) See Nikon Info here … amazing camera!

http://www.nikon.com.au/en_AU/product/digital-compact-cameras/performance/coolpix-p900

The Very Last Sandalwood Tree in My Hometown of Dumbleyung in Western Australia – Once there were Millions!

The Very Last Sandalwood Tree in My Hometown of Dumbleyung in Western Australia – Once there were Millions!

A Bit of Aboriginal Bush Tucker from Western Australia – Sandalwood Nuts

Bridal Creeper Wreaking Havoc on Native Bushland & Ancient Sandalwood Oil Trees

W.A. Bush Tucker Bushwalk Tips – Walking through Spiderwebs & Quandong & Sandalwood Seed Differences

The Very Last Sandalwood Tree in Dumbleyung – Western Australia – Once there were Millions!

Bridal Creeper Wreaking Havoc on Native Bushland & Ancient Sandalwood Oil Trees

Bridal Creeper Wreaking Havoc on Native Bushland & Ancient Sandalwood Oil Trees

Did You Know Even Mice Have Beautiful Little Hearts Too! Baby Mouse Rescue!

Did You Know Even Mice Have Beautiful Little Hearts Too! Baby Mouse Rescue!

Even those Mice are feral animals and pest…. I just dont have the heart or strength to kill animals…. maybe I should because a Buddhist Monk! I respect Buddism Immmensely!

So here is a little Mouse I rescued from my cat… and other predators in my Back Yard!

My Dad always said to me….

“Billy, always remember … everything was put on this earth for a reason… a reason of goodness”

Like I say, mice are pests … but in regards to native species in Australia…. our country has lost

EXTINCTION AND EHDANGERED SPECIES IN AUSTRALIA

Extinction is a natural evolutionary process. Nowadays, however, most extinctions are caused by humans. The most obvious difference between natural evolutionary extinctions and those induced by people is the rate. The current rate is much higher than the background natural rate and will increase further unless action is taken now.

Australia unfortunately provides too many striking examples of an increased rate of extinction since the arrival of Europeans. In only 200 years, 18 species of endemic mammals have become extinct (7 per cent of the total). This is half of all the mammal species that have become extinct worldwide in historical times.

About 100 species of vascular plants, 0.8 per cent of the total, have become extinct, the overwhelming majority having occurred in areas cleared for farming. Of the plant species presumed extinct in Western Australia (1.4 per cent of the State’s flora), 90 per cent occurred in the agricultural lands of the south-west corner of the State. It is likely that some species of plants disappeared before they could be collected and named by scientists. These data compare unfavourably with only 27 extinct plant species in the whole of Europe (0.2 per cent), 39 in southern Africa (0.2 per cent) and 74 in continental USA (0.4 per cent).

An endangered species is one that could become extinct in the wild in 10 to 20 years, if nothing is done to protect it. Recent reviews suggest that about 40 species of mammals (16 per cent of living species) are threatened with extinction and that 209 species (1.4 per cent) of vascular plants are endangered with a further 784 species (5.2 per cent) being vulnerable.

The national figures for extinct and threatened species, shocking though they are, do not indicate the extent to which local diversity has been lost in large areas of the country. Many species are clinging to existence in small areas and may not be classified as threatened nationally, even though they are no longer found throughout their former range.

On a regional basis. extinctions have been much higher in some areas than in others. In the deserts, for example, 33 per cent of the mammal species are extinct and 90 per cent of all mammal species with an adult body weight between 35 grams and 5,500 grams are either extinct or endangered. The number of endangered plants is highest in the agricultural areas of the south-east and south-west, the east coast and in the rainforests of north Queensland. Victoria alone recognises 400 plant species as being ‘at risk’, compared with the national figure of 209 species classified as endangered.

Extinction continues. The extinct mammals, for example, did not all disappear last century. Recent studies have shown that most extinctions have occurred in the past 40 to 50 years. The ranges of many species continue to shrink.

CAUSES OF EXTINCTION

Several processes have led to species becoming extinct or endangered. Often because extinctions happened some time ago and were not studied at the time, the exact reason for the loss of a particular species is not known. In many cases there were probably several compounding reasons. Some accepted reasons for species extinctions are shown below.

Threatened fauna of Australia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Threatened_fauna_of_Australia

List of extinct animals of Australia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_extinct_animals_of_Australia

Even Mice have Beautiful Little Hearts Too … You Know! Baby Mouse Rescue!