Tag Archives: Native

The Majestic Wedge Tail Eagle – Dumbleyung – The Great Southern – Western Australia

The Majestic Wedge Tail Eagle – Dumbleyung – The Great Southern – Western Australia

My Wedged Tail Eagle Videos

My Playlist on Birds in My Area
Bird Sightings & Species of the Great Southern Area & Dumbleyung – Western Australia

First Time Nikon Coolpix P900 – Amazing Reptile Footage – Long Distance Shot – Earth is Flat!

Check out all of my amazing playlists of my adventures
https://www.youtube.com/user/LostTreasureComAU/playlists

First Time Nikon Coolpix P900 – Amazing Reptile Footage – Long Distance Shot – So I bought the Nikon Coolpix P900 to help with the effort to provide more convincing undeniable evidence that the Earth is Flat… so please subscribe and stay tuned! Flat Earth Proof Videos Coming Soon

See Evidence here: nikon coolpix p900 flat earth proofs!
https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=nikon+coolpix+p900+flat+earth

The P900 delivers the highest zoom in its class with 83x optical zoom (24mm – 2000mm) See Nikon Info here … amazing camera!

http://www.nikon.com.au/en_AU/product/digital-compact-cameras/performance/coolpix-p900

The Majestic Wedge Tail Eagle – Dumbleyung – The Great Southern – Western Australia

Black-faced Woodswallow – Artamus cinereus Artamidae – Great Southern – Western Australia

Black-faced Woodswallow – Artamus cinereus Artamidae – Great Southern – Western Australia

These birds are so beautiful, playful and cute! The Black-Faced Woodswallow with Babies ….. sorry about the wind noise!

The Black-faced Woodswallow often associates with other species of woodswallows as well as White-winged and Varied Trillers, but it is their association with Hooded Parrots in the Northern Territory that is especially intriguing. Hooded Parrots almost always forage in the company of Black-faced Woodswallows. The woodswallows are used by the parrots as sentinels to warn of the approach of potential predators, such as Brown, Grey or Red Goshawks, and whenever the woodswallows give their alarm calls, the parrots fly away to safety.

Description

The Black-faced Woodswallow is a smokey grey-brown above with a black face around the base of the bill and the eyes. The underparts are lighter grey with a black undertail in the race cinereus or a white undertail in the race albiventris of north-eastern Queensland. The black tail feathers are tipped white. The bluish bill is tipped black. Young birds are mainly brown, with extensive streaking, the underparts are washed buff-brown and they have a pale brown bill. May be seen in groups, often with other woodswallows, and roosts in tight clusters in trees during storms or sudden cold weather.

Similar Species

The Black-faced Woodswallow is similar to the Dusky Woodswallow, A. cyanopterus, and the Masked Woodswallow, A. personatus. It differs from the Dusky by being paler overall and lacks the white streak along the leading edge of the wing. The Masked Woodswallow has a larger and more defined face mask that extends down the throat to the upper breast, bordered by a white crescent. It also has paler underparts and a pale grey rather than black tail.

Distribution

The Black-faced Woodswallow is found across mainland Australia, mainly west of the Great Dividing Range in Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria, and is absent from the far south-western corner of Western Australia.

Habitat

The Black-faced Woodswallow is found in open country, often far from water, as well as in open woodlands, around lakes and wetlands and in irrigated areas.

Feeding

The Black-faced Woodswallow feeds on insects. It perches on shrubs, fences and telegraph wires, darting down to catch prey and will often hover. It will also eat nectar. Often feeds in mixed flocks with swifts and swiflets, and also associates with other woodswallows and the White-winged Triller.

Breeding

Black-faced Woodswallows nest and rear their young co-operatively, often mobbing potential predators. The nests are flimsy constructions of twigs placed low in a small tree, stump or artificial structure

Dusky Woodswallow
http://www.birdlife.org.au/bird-profile/dusky-woodswallow

Source: http://www.birdlife.org.au/bird-profile/black-faced-woodswallow

Pink and Grey Galah (Cocky) – The Great Southern – Western Australia – (Eolophus roseicapilla)

Pink and Grey Galah (Cocky) – The Great Southern – Western Australia – (Eolophus roseicapilla)

Galahs were once confined to the open plains that occur beyond the inland slopes of the Great Divide in eastern Australia, north of the Flinders Ranges in South Australia, and north of the Mulga–Eucalypt line in Western Australia. However, following the clearing of subcoastal woodlands for farming, Galahs began to flood in, taking advantage of the new habitat and its abundant supply of food. They even spread to the coasts, where they are now a familiar sight in the cities.

Basic Information
Scientific Name: Eolophus roseicapillus
Featured bird groups: Parrots
Atlas Number:
273
What does it look like?
Description:
The Galah can be easily identified by its rose-pink head, neck and underparts, with paler pink crown, and grey back, wings and undertail. Birds from the west of Australia have comparatively paler plumage. Galahs have a bouncing acrobatic flight, but spend much of the day sheltering from heat in the foliage of trees and shrubs. Huge noisy flocks of birds congregate and roost together at night.

Similar species:
The Galah is generally unmistakable, but in flight may resemble aGang-gang Cockatoo in shape.

Where does it live?
Distribution:
The Galah is one of the most abundant and familiar of the Australian parrots, occurring over most of Australia, including some offshore islands.

Habitat:
The Galah is found in large flocks in a variety of timbered habitats, usually near water.

What does it do?
Feeding:
Galahs form huge, noisy flocks which feed on seeds, mostly from the ground. Seeds of grasses and cultivated crops are eaten, making these birds agricultural pests in some areas. Birds may travel large distances in search of favourable feeding grounds.

Breeding:
Galahs form permanent pair bonds, although a bird will take a new partner if the other one dies. The nest is a tree hollow or similar location, lined with leaves. Both sexes incubate the eggs and care for the young. There is high chick mortality in Galahs, with up to 50 % of chicks dying in the first six months. Galahs have been recorded breeding with other members of the cockatoo family, both in the wild and captivity. These include the Sulphur-crested Cockatoo, C. galerita.

Living with us
The Galah is becoming more abundant around areas of human habitation, with the growth in population largely a result of increasing availability of food and water. Escaped aviary birds have also contributed to these numbers.

References:
Parrots and Pigeons of Australia
Source:
http://www.birdsinbackyards.net/species/Eolophus-roseicapillus
http://www.birdlife.org.au/bird-profile/galah

My Playlist on Birds in My Area
Bird Sightings & Species of the Great Southern Area & Dumbleyung – Western Australia

First Time Nikon Coolpix P900 – Amazing Reptile Footage – Long Distance Shot – Earth is Flat!

Check out all of my amazing playlists of my adventures
https://www.youtube.com/user/LostTreasureComAU/playlists

First Time Nikon Coolpix P900 – Amazing Reptile Footage – Long Distance Shot – So I bought the Nikon Coolpix P900 to help with the effort to provide more convincing undeniable evidence that the Earth is Flat… so please subscribe and stay tuned! Flat Earth Proof Videos Coming Soon

See Evidence here: nikon coolpix p900 flat earth proofs!
https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=nikon+coolpix+p900+flat+earth

The P900 delivers the highest zoom in its class with 83x optical zoom (24mm – 2000mm) See Nikon Info here … amazing camera!

http://www.nikon.com.au/en_AU/product/digital-compact-cameras/performance/coolpix-p900

A Beautiful Snow and Ice Covered Pink Lake in Southern Western Australia… Not!

A Beautiful Snow and Ice Covered Pink Lake in Southern Western Australia… Not!

More Videos on Soil Erosion, Salinity and the Devastating Environmental Effects of Land Clearing in the Great Southern Region of Western Australia

Seeing My Country Die Before My Eyes… Salinity & Rubbish Dump Groundwater Contamination

The Silent Killer of the Lower part Southern Australia – Salinity and Soil Erosion

Ancient History – Aboriginal Tools & Vibrant Rich Colors, Shadows, Shapes an Oasis in the Desert

Mother Nature Will One Day Reclaim Mother Earth, Witnessing the Destruction Caused By Modern Day Man

This is What True Aussie Kindness & Spirit is … on a Scorching Hot Summer’s Day – 40°C Plus

A Beautiful Ice and Snow Covered Pink Lake in Southern Western Australia… Not!

A Beautiful Snow and Ice Covered Pink Lake in Southern Western Australia… Not!

A Beautiful Snow and Ice Covered Pink Lake in Southern Western Australia… Not!

More Videos on Soil Erosion, Salinity and the Devastating Environmental Effects of Land Clearing in the Great Southern Region of Western Australia

Seeing My Country Die Before My Eyes… Salinity & Rubbish Dump Groundwater Contamination

The Silent Killer of the Lower part Southern Australia – Salinity and Soil Erosion

Ancient History – Aboriginal Tools & Vibrant Rich Colors, Shadows, Shapes an Oasis in the Desert

Mother Nature Will One Day Reclaim Mother Earth, Witnessing the Destruction Caused By Modern Day Man

This is What True Aussie Kindness & Spirit is … on a Scorching Hot Summer’s Day – 40°C Plus

A Beautiful Ice and Snow Covered Pink Lake in Southern Western Australia… Not!

Native Birds will Love You for this! Recycle Your Old Pillows, Dog Fur & Brush Hair, & Vacuums

Native Birds will Love You for this! Recycle Your Old Pillow Fluff, Dog & Human Hair, Vacuum Dust…use your imagination!

Awesome News! Western Australian Red Tail Phascogale Breeding Box Success! Dumbleyung W.A

Awesome News! Western Australian Red Tail Phascogale Breeding Box Success! Dumbleyung W.A

RED-TAILED PHASCOGALE
http://perthzoo.wa.gov.au/animals-plants/australia/nocturnal-house/red-tailed-phascogale/

Phascogale calura — Red-tailed Phascogale
http://www.environment.gov.au/cgi-bin/sprat/public/publicspecies.pl?taxon_id=316

Part 1
Setting Up a Nesting Box for Western Australian Red Tail Phascogales (Old Guitar Nesting Box)

Part 2
Bushwalk – Mushrooms, Kangaroo’s, Hollows, Tiny Marsupial Nesting Box Success, Tree Gum Tool Making

Part 3
Awesome News! Western Australian Red Tail Phascogale Breeding Box Success!

Scientific name: Phascogale calura
Conservation Status: Near Threatened
Body length: 11-15 cm
Weight: 35-70 g
Gestation: About 30 days
Number of young: 6-15

Distribution: Wheatbelt region in Western Australia
Habitat: The Red-tailed Phascogale is restricted to isolated patches of forest that receive 300-600 mm of annual rainfall

Description: The Red-tailed Phascogale’s fur is mostly ash-brown, which fades to white under the belly. The tail is a deep rust colour that extends to a hairy black brush at the end. At 13–14 cm, it is almost as long as the phascogale’s body.

Diet: Red-tailed Phascogales are carnivores. They eat insects, small mammals and birds. They receive enough water through their food and therefore rarely have to drink water.

In the wild: For a three-week period in July, males embark on an exhausting and fatal frenzy of mating. They travel large distances to mate with as many females as possible. During this flurry of mating activity, the males’ immune system fails before they reach 12 months of age and they succumb to stress-related illnesses and die. Females usually survive the mating season to breed a second or third time.

Threats: Habitat destruction and introduced predators such as cats and foxes are the greatest threats to the Red-tailed Phascogale.

At Perth Zoo: You can see Red-tailed Phascogales in the Nocturnal House

Bushwalk – Mushrooms, Kangaroo’s, Hollows, Tiny Marsupial Nesting Box Success, Tree Gum Tool Making

Bushwalk – Mushrooms, Kangaroo’s, Hollows, Tiny Marsupial Nesting Box Success, Tree Gum Tool Making

Removing a Kangaroo Tick from a Bobtail Lizard’s Mouth – The Western Spotted Frog Burrow

Removing a Kangaroo Tick from a Bobtail Lizard’s Mouth – The Western Spotted Frog Burrow

The Kangaroo Tick
http://tinyurl.com/hyknfyg

Successful Removal of Melted Road Tar off Reptiles – Bobtail – Use Olive Oil!

My other interesting videos on the western australian bob tail lizard, snakes, reptile smugglers etc
https://www.youtube.com/user/LostTreasureComAU/search?query=bobtail

Carpet Snake Update and a Bush Blood Sucking Kangaroo Tick

Removing a Tick from a Bobtail Lizard’s Mouth – Western Spotted Frog Burrow

Australian Aboriginals, Exact Same Issues as Native Americans, Canadian Aborigine, Eskimo Cultures

Australian Aboriginals, Exact Same Issues as Native Americans, Canadian Aborigine, Eskimo Cultures